Oil drilling

DIC 2016 Obama bans oil drilling 'permanently' in millions of acres of ocean.

DIC 2016 Obama bans oil drilling 'permanently' in millions of acres of ocean.     Outgoing US President Barack Obama has permanently banned offshore oil and gas drilling in the "vast majority" of US-owned northern waters.
Mr Obama designated areas in the Arctic and Atlantic oceans as "indefinitely off limits" to future leasing.
The move is widely seen as an attempt to protect the region before Mr Obama leaves office in January.
Supporters of president-elect Donald Trump could find it difficult to reverse the decision.
Canada also committed to a similar measure in its own Arctic waters, in a joint announcement with Washington.
The White House said the decision was for "a strong, sustainable and viable Arctic economy and ecosystem." It cited native cultural needs, wildlife concerns, and the "vulnerability" of the region to oil spills as some of the reasons for the ban.
But while Canada will review the move every five years, the White House insists Mr Obama's declaration is permanent.
The decision relies on a 1953 law which allows the president to ban leasing of offshore resources indefinitely.

   Twitter Google Facebook LinkedIn Tumblr
ID: 689
Interconectamos sistemas de picking con el WMS de la empresa N:92  

Fracking and humans

Authors retract study that found pollution near fracking sites

Authors retract study that found pollution near fracking sites     The authors of two environmental papers, including one about the effects of fracking on human health, have retracted them after discovering crucial mistakes.

   Twitter Google Facebook LinkedIn Tumblr
ID: 141
Software educativo N:58  

SHALE

Shale in Russia, China, Europe, Australia and Latin America. (Shale Oil, Part: II)

Shale in Russia, China, Europe, Australia and Latin America. (Shale Oil, Part: II)     Russia and China will lead the way in the production of resources from shale after the US according to executives at the Financial Times Global Commodities
Summit in Lausanne, Switzerland, as reported in April by Rigzone. Torbjorn Tomqvist, chief executive of trading house Gunvor said (…) it was clear that
shale production on a similar scale to that in the US is possible in several of the world´s biggest current energy producers and consumers, but that Europe is
unlikely to be transformed by it. Mr Tomqvist added “I think in Russia, you will see the first major change. You have the political climate there to drive
through large-scale shale operations both in gas and oil.” (1)

162759002Russia’s shale oil potential is not fully mapped, but the Bazhenov formation in Western Siberia is considered one of the largest, and ExxonMobil
teamed up with Rosneft at the start of 2013 to begin drilling. (2)

Tomqvist also said that China, Australia and South America were promising as shale-exploiting countries. Bob H. Takai, general manager in energy for
Sumitomo Corp said that China could rival Russia as the biggest shale producer: “As far as the reserve is concerned I think China has got the largest potential
reserves of shale oil and shale gas, even bigger than the US.” But he added that before those reserves could be accessed China would struggle with problems
ranging from infrastructure to the availability of water. (3)

The country could, according to “Clyde Russell: Australia, Not China, the Next Great Shale Gas Hope”, lose out to Australia in the race to be second behind
the United States in bringing significant production on line. Australia has several advantages over China when it comes to developing shale gas reserves.
Even though the reserves are in remote areas, there is existing infrastructure available as some of these areas, such as the central Australian Cooper Basin,
have long histories of conventional gas and oil production. This gives shale gas output the ability to flow from the centre of the country to the east coast
where it could be fed into existing, or expanded, LNG plants. In fact, Santos, Australia’s number two energy firm has started shale output on a commercial
scale and plans to feed the gas into an LNG plant that it is building in partnership with Malasia’s state-owned Petronas. (4)

   Twitter Google Facebook LinkedIn Tumblr
ID: 963
Recursos informativos para mantener la salud de una manera natural N:93  

SHALE

Shale in Africa and Asia (Shale Oil, Part: III)

Shale in Africa and Asia (Shale Oil, Part: III)     Algeria

Algeria’s hydrocarbons basins hold two significant shale gas and shale oil formations: the Silurian Tannezuft Shale and the Devonian Frasnian Shale. The
Energy Information Administration, Advanced Resources International, Inc (EIA-ARI) report World Shale Gas and Shale Oil Resource Assessment, June
2013, which analyses the Ghadames (Berkine) and Illizi Basins in eastern Algeria, the Timimoun, Ahnet and Mouydir Basins in centre of the country, and the
Reggane and Tindouf Basins in the southwest, estimates that there are 3,419 trillion cubic feet of risked* shale gas in place with 707 trillion cubic feet as the
risked, technically recoverable** shale gas resource. Six of these basins contain 121 billion barrels of risked shale oil and condensates in-place, with 5.7 billion
barrels as the risked technically recoverable shale oil resource.

Notes: *An adjustment to the total hydrocarbon in-place taking into account the current knowledge about the play, the quality of the data, and the current
state of technology. **Calculated by applying a recovery factor to risked gas in-place. Varies between 15%-35% with most plays in the 20%-30% range.

the country’s national petroleum company, Sonatrach (Société nationale de transport et de la commercialisation des hydrocarbures) has undertaken a
comprehensive effort to define the size of its shale gas and shale oil reserves. Pilot wells are scheduled first for the Berkine (Ghadames) Basin, followed by
test wells in Illizi, Timimoun, Ahmet and Mouydir basins. The international energy companies Statoil and Repsol have also undertaken geological and
reservoir characterization studies of Algeria’s shales. Over the last year the country modified its hydrocarbons legislation to improve the investment climate
in anticipation of a hydrocarbons licensing round in 2013. Sonatrach is expected to remain dominant in the sector, according to the report.


Libya

The EIA-ARI report considers three of the four major hydrocarbons basins in Libya: the Ghadames (Berkine) basin in the west of Libya, the Sirte basin in the
centre, and the Murzuq basin in the southwest. The Kufra Basin in the southeast is not assessed quantitatively by the report. The first three of the basins
mentioned contain 942 trillion cubic feet of risked shale gas in-place with 122 trillion cubic feet as the risked, technically recoverable shale gas resource. They
also contain 613 billion barrels of risked shale oil and condensates in-place with 26.1 billion barrels as the risked, technically recoverable shale oil resource.
Furthermore, according to ARI “(…) it is likely that future exploration will identify additional shale resources in other basins and formations.”

In late 2012, the Chairman of Libya’s national oil company, National Oil Company (NOC), Nuri Berruien, announced that the company was examining
options for the exploration of unconventional oil and gas resources, one option being to make an internal evaluation and then bring in international
companies with expertise in unconventional exploration and development.

Egypt

Egypt has four basins in the Western Desert with shale oil and gas potential: Abu Gharadig, Alamein, Natrun, and Shoushan-Matruh. The largest horizon is
the Khatatba Shale in the Middle Jurassic Khatatba Formation. ARI estimates that this Khatatba Shale contains around 535 trillion cubic feet of risked shale
gas in-place with 100 trillion cubic feet of risked, technically recoverable shale gas resources. In terms of shale oil, ARI assesses that here there are about 114
billion barrels of risked shale oil in-place, with 4.6 billion barrels of risked, technically recoverable shale oil resources.

South Africa

   Twitter Google Facebook LinkedIn Tumblr
ID: 966
Oil economy focus N:57  

SHALE

Shale in Russia, China, Europe, Australia and Latin America. (Shale Oil, Part: II)

Shale in Russia, China, Europe, Australia and Latin America. (Shale Oil, Part: II)     Russia and China will lead the way in the production of resources from shale after the US according to executives at the Financial Times Global Commodities
Summit in Lausanne, Switzerland, as reported in April by Rigzone. Torbjorn Tomqvist, chief executive of trading house Gunvor said (…) it was clear that
shale production on a similar scale to that in the US is possible in several of the world´s biggest current energy producers and consumers, but that Europe is
unlikely to be transformed by it. Mr Tomqvist added “I think in Russia, you will see the first major change. You have the political climate there to drive
through large-scale shale operations both in gas and oil.” (1)

162759002Russia’s shale oil potential is not fully mapped, but the Bazhenov formation in Western Siberia is considered one of the largest, and ExxonMobil
teamed up with Rosneft at the start of 2013 to begin drilling. (2)

Tomqvist also said that China, Australia and South America were promising as shale-exploiting countries. Bob H. Takai, general manager in energy for
Sumitomo Corp said that China could rival Russia as the biggest shale producer: “As far as the reserve is concerned I think China has got the largest potential
reserves of shale oil and shale gas, even bigger than the US.” But he added that before those reserves could be accessed China would struggle with problems
ranging from infrastructure to the availability of water. (3)

The country could, according to “Clyde Russell: Australia, Not China, the Next Great Shale Gas Hope”, lose out to Australia in the race to be second behind
the United States in bringing significant production on line. Australia has several advantages over China when it comes to developing shale gas reserves.
Even though the reserves are in remote areas, there is existing infrastructure available as some of these areas, such as the central Australian Cooper Basin,
have long histories of conventional gas and oil production. This gives shale gas output the ability to flow from the centre of the country to the east coast
where it could be fed into existing, or expanded, LNG plants. In fact, Santos, Australia’s number two energy firm has started shale output on a commercial
scale and plans to feed the gas into an LNG plant that it is building in partnership with Malasia’s state-owned Petronas. (4)

   Twitter Google Facebook LinkedIn Tumblr
ID: 964
Payoneer: 
International Money 
Transfers Service N:900  

Contactos

Teléfonos: +58 212 578 1145
Fax: +58 212 576 3892


Trip1200