T: Technology ID: 771 I: 74 P: 6.17 C: 0.0267

Who is Peggy Whitson?

 WomenNASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, the only woman living onboard the International Space Station at the moment, is on track to break a big spaceflight record: at the end of April, she will have spent more cumulative hours in space than any other US astronaut. But now it looks like Whitson’s going to rack up even more flight time in lower Earth orbit than originally planned. NASA announced today that Whitson will be extending her stay on the ISS by an additional three months, adding even more hours to her record-breaking time in space.

Whitson launched to the ISS in November 2016 on a Russian Soyuz rocket, along with Russian cosmonaut Oleg Novitskiy and Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency. Their stay on the ISS, known as Expedition 51, was meant to last until June. That’s still true for Pesquet and Novitskiy, but Whitson will now come back sometime in September. Her trip back to Earth will be with NASA astronaut Jack Fischer and cosmonaut Fyodor Yurchikhin — two crew members who are slated to launch to the ISS later this month




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“Shale 2.0”: Shale Drilling Turned From Art Into Science

 ShaleExxon Mobil, Royal Dutch Shell and Chevron plan to spend a combined $10 billion this year in American shale. If successful, they’ll scramble the U.S. energy business, boost American oil production, keep prices low, and steal influence from big producers. Furthermore, they are transforming shale drilling into a more economical operation. At Bongo 76-43, Shell is drilling five wells in a single pad for the first time, each about 20 feet apart, and is now able to drill 16 wells with a single rig every year, up from six in 2013.




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Pentagon

The Pentagon operates the oldest computer program still in use – from 1958

 PentagonIn 1958, the DoD’s first contracting software was launched, using an early computer language called COBOL. As of 2017, that software still manages Pentagon contracts.
According to Technology Review, the program known as MOCAS, Mechanization of Contract Administration Services, began its life on punchcards. Eventually it was updated to green screened, terminal-style computers.
Though a new-looking graphic interface often replaces the antiquated green text prompts, the insides are still very much the same. A series of new additions and plug-and-play storage devices hides an eight-gigabyte RAM system that manages $1.3 trillion in Pentagon contracting.
The reason the system was never replaced is due to the fact that its replacement would have to immediately take over the entire system as a whole to ensure that no contract — and none of the money — is lost in the transition.





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Ransomware-fighting coalition adds members and decryption tools By @lconstantin from @Computerworld

 SecurityThe No More Ransom project, a coalition of law enforcement and security companies, has expanded with 30 new members and added 32 new decryption tools for various ransomware variants.

The project, which consists of a website dedicated to fighting ransomware, was originally launched by Europol’s European Cybercrime Centre in partnership with the National High Tech Crime Unit of the Netherlands police, Kaspersky Lab, and Intel Security.

The website has a tool that allows users to determine which type of ransomware has affected their files but also contains general information about ransomware, prevention advice, and instruction on reporting incidents to law enforcement.

One section of the website is dedicated to decryption tools that participating companies have developed for various ransomware variants. The creation of such tools is possible because some ransomware programs have flaws in their cryptographic implementations.




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HAPPENED IN 2016

World's largest radio telescope completed in China

 HAPPENED IN 2016China on Sunday hoisted the final piece into position on what will be the world's largest radio telescope, which it will use to explore space and help in the hunt for extraterrestrial life, state media said.

The Five-hundred-metre Aperture Spherical Telescope, or FAST, is the size of 20 Canadian football fields and has been hewed out of a mountain in the poor southwestern province of Guizhou.

China will relocate 9,000 people to build world's biggest radio telescope
Scientists will now start debugging and trials of the telescope, Zheng Xiaonian, deputy head of the National Astronomical Observation under the Chinese Academy of Sciences, which built the telescope, told the official Xinhua news agency.

"The project has the potential to search for more strange objects to better understand the origin of the universe and
boost the global hunt for extraterrestrial life," the report paraphrased Zheng as saying.




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Inovation future

Innovations that could shape the future of computing

 Inovation futureMoore’s Law posits that the number of transistors on a microprocessor — and therefore their computing power — will double every two years. It’s held true since Gordon Moore came up with it in 1965, but its imminent end has been predicted for years. As long ago as 2000, the MIT Technology Review raised a warning about the limits of how small and fast silicon technology can get.

The thing is, Moore’s Law isn't really a law. It’s more of a self-fulfilling prophecy. Moore didn’t describe an immutable truth, like gravity or the conservation of momentum. He simply set our expectations, and lo, the chip makers delivered accordingly.

In fact, the industry keeps finding new ways to pack more power onto tinier chips. Unfortunately, they haven’t found ways to cut costs on the same exponential curve. As Fast Company reported in February 2016, the worldwide semiconductor industry is no longer planning to base its R&D plans for silicon chips around the notion of doubling their power every two years, because it simply can’t afford to keep up that pace in purchasing the incredibly complex manufacturing tools and processes necessary. Besides, current manufacturing technology may not be able to shrink silicon transistors much more than it already has. And in any event, transistors have become so tiny that they may no longer reliably follow the usual laws of physics — which raises questions about how much longer we’ll dare to use them in medical devices or nuclear plants.




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What is 32-bit and 64-bit? by @TechAdvisorUK

 AdvicePCs, laptops, Macs, Windows, phones and tablets - everything is 64-bit these days. Even some smartphones are 64-bit.
The main reason for the switch from 32-bit is to get past the limit on the amount of memory a 32-bit processor can access.
What is 32-bit and 64-bit?
Put simply, 32-bit is shorthand for a 32-bit number. This number contains 32 bits (binary digits) which are either 0 or 1. And example could be 10101010101010101010101010101010.
A 32-bit processor is - by definition - capable of dealing with instructions and referencing memory locations of 32-bits.




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HAPPENED IN 2016

Gravitational Waves Detected 100 Years After Einstein's Prediction

 HAPPENED IN 2016LIGO Opens New Window on the Universe with Observation of Gravitational Waves from Colliding Black Holes

WASHINGTON, DC/Cascina, Italy

For the first time, scientists have observed ripples in the fabric of spacetime called gravitational waves, arriving at the earth from a cataclysmic event in the distant universe. This confirms a major prediction of Albert Einstein’s 1915 general theory of relativity and opens an unprecedented new window onto the cosmos.

Gravitational waves carry information about their dramatic origins and about the nature of gravity that cannot otherwise be obtained. Physicists have concluded that the detected gravitational waves were produced during the final fraction of a second of the merger of two black holes to produce a single, more massive spinning black hole. This collision of two black holes had been predicted but never observed.

The gravitational waves were detected on September 14, 2015 at 5:51 a.m. Eastern Daylight Time (09:51 UTC) by both of the twin Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors, located in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington, USA. The LIGO Observatories are funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), and were conceived, built, and are operated by Caltech and MIT. The discovery, accepted for publication in the journal Physical Review Letters, was made by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration (which includes the GEO Collaboration and the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy) and the Virgo Collaboration using data from the two LIGO detectors.

Based on the observed signals, LIGO scientists estimate that the black holes for this event were about 29 and 36 times the mass of the sun, and the event took place 1.3 billion years ago. About 3 times the mass of the sun was converted into gravitational waves in a fraction of a second—with a peak power output about 50 times that of the whole visible universe. By looking at the time of arrival of the signals—the detector in Livingston recorded the event 7 milliseconds before the detector in Hanford—scientists can say that the source was located in the Southern Hemisphere.

According to general relativity, a pair of black holes orbiting around each other lose energy through the emission of gravitational waves, causing them to gradually approach each other over billions of years, and then much more quickly in the final minutes. During the final fraction of a second, the two black holes collide into each other at nearly one-half the speed of light and form a single more massive black hole, converting a portion of the combined black holes’ mass to energy, according to Einstein’s formula E=mc2. This energy is emitted as a final strong burst of gravitational waves. It is these gravitational waves that LIGO has observed.

The existence of gravitational waves was first demonstrated in the 1970s and 80s by Joseph Taylor, Jr., and colleagues. Taylor and Russell Hulse discovered in 1974 a binary system composed of a pulsar in orbit around a neutron star. Taylor and Joel M. Weisberg in 1982 found that the orbit of the pulsar was slowly shrinking over time because of the release of energy in the form of gravitational waves. For discovering the pulsar and showing that it would make possible this particular gravitational wave measurement, Hulse and Taylor were awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1993.

The new LIGO discovery is the first observation of gravitational waves themselves, made by measuring the tiny disturbances the waves make to space and time as they pass through the earth.

“Our observation of gravitational waves accomplishes an ambitious goal set out over 5 decades ago to directly detect this elusive phenomenon and better understand the universe, and, fittingly, fulfills Einstein’s legacy on the 100th anniversary of his general theory of relativity,” says Caltech’s David H. Reitze, executive director of the LIGO Laboratory.




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Inventory

Improve your inventory management.

 InventoryGood inventroy tracking menas good finantial performance. Using profesional invetory tracking tools improves time managemet and assets knowlege. ADC is the perferct partner for thos goal. learn more at Symtechven




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Rust is a systems programming language that runs blazingly fast, prevents segfaults.

 RustRust is a systems programming language that runs blazingly fast, prevents segfaults, and guarantees thread safety.

Featuring



  • zero-cost abstractions

  • move semantics

  • guaranteed memory safety

  • threads without data races

  • trait-based generics

  • pattern matching

  • type inference

  • minimal runtime

  • efficient C bindings





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Javascript power

A history of JavaScript across the stack

 Javascript powerDid you know that JavaScript was created in 10 days? In May 1995, Brendan Eich wrote the first version of JavaScript in 10 days while working at Netscape.

For the first 10 years of JavaScript's life, professional programmers denigrated JavaScript because its target audience consisted of "amateurs". That changed in 2004 with the launch of Gmail. Gmail was the first popular web application that really showed off what was possible with client-side JavaScript. Competing e-mail services such as Yahoo! Mail and Hotmail featured extremely slow interfaces that used server-side rendering almost exclusively, with almost every action by the user requiring the server to reload the entire web page. Gmail began to work around these limitations by using XMLHttpRequest for asynchronous data retrieval from the server. Gmail's use of JavaScript caught the attention of developers around the world. Today, Gmail is the classic example of a single-page JavaScript app; it can respond immediately to user interactions and no longer needs to make roundtrips to the server just to render a new page.




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Twitter future

The Near future of twitter according to Jack Dorsey. A Bloomberg interview

 Twitter futureLast year, amid a cratering stock price, slowing user growth, and a spate of executive departures, Twitter Inc.'s board decided to put co-founder Jack Dorsey in as chief executive.

Ten months later, all the same problems remain. But Dorsey has a clearer message about what he wants to change and how he wants to change it. As investors speculate about who will buy Twitter and when, Dorsey has allowed himself to think years down the road. In a wide-ranging interview with Bloomberg Businessweek, he hints at that future. Will Twitter, currently tasked with showing you what's happening right now, be able to predict for you what's going to happen next? Is it the killer app for augmented reality?

Dorsey says Twitter's role in the world still centers around bringing people together to watch live events in the place where information comes the fastest. A decade after Twitter's founding, he has faith in the crowd and its ability to bring forth a range of opinions—balancing Donald Trump's inaccuracies, for instance—but he also talks about the importance of making Twitter a safer place to speak without fear of being attacked or harassed. What follows is a lightly edited transcript of the conversation.




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